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Tuesday, August 27, 2013

NEW VIDEOS HIGHLIGHT EARTH SYSTEMS

An aerial infrared image of a tidal wetland that is linked to a topographic map

Bird Conservation Research, Inc. has just released its first two videos from a planned series on environmental science.  The videos follow the national AP Environmental Science curriculum.

The videos are entitled Earth Systems 1 and Earth Systems 2.  They investigate large scale physical processes occurring on Earth and relate these phenomena to life processes.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

STUDY OF GEOGRAPHIC BIRD DIVERSITY PATTERNS NOW AVAILABLE



The second major paper to arise from the Forest Bird Survey of Southern New England is now available for free download from the Bird Conservation Research, Inc. web site as well as from Bird Conservation Contributions- the scientific journal of BCR.  This paper, FACTORS INFLUENCING GEOGRAPHIC PATTERNS IN DIVERSITY OF FOREST BIRD COMMUNITIES OF EASTERN CONNECTICUT, USA, explores patterns uncovered during four years of summer and winter studies.  The abstract follows:

At regional scales, the most important variables associated with diversity are latitudinally-based temperature and net primary productivity, although diversity is also influenced by habitat. We examined bird species richness, community density and community evenness in forests of eastern Connecticut to determine whether: 1) spatial and seasonal patterns exist in diversity, 2) energy explains the greatest proportion of variation in diversity parameters, 3) variation in habitat explains remaining diversity variance, and 4) seasonal shifts in diversity provide clues about how environmental variables shape communities. We sought to discover if our data supported predictions of the species-energy hypothesis. We used the variable circular plot technique to estimate bird populations and quantified the location, elevation, forest type, vegetation type, canopy cover, moisture regime, understory density and primary production for the study sites. We found that 1) summer richness and population densities are roughly equal in northeastern and southeastern Connecticut, whereas in winter both concentrate toward the coast, 2) variables linked with temperature explained much of the patterns in winter diversity, but energy-related variables showed little relationship to summer diversity, 3) the effect of habitat variables on diversity parameters predominated in summer, although their effect was weak, 4) contrary to theory, evenness increased from summer to winter, and 5) support for predictions of species-energy theory was primarily restricted to winter data. Although energy and habitat played a role in explaining community patterns, they left much of the variance in regional diversity unexplained, suggesting that a large stochastic component to diversity also may exist.